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Jun 6 16

ICA Fukuoka 2016

by Benjamin

I am thrilled to have several posters at this year’s ICA conference. Stop by and say hello!

Sunday, June 12, 9:30-10:45 in Argos D
Johnson, B. K., Eden, A., & Reinecke, L. (2016, June). Self-control and need satisfaction in primetime: Television, social media, and friends can enhance regulatory resources via perceived autonomy and competence.

Sunday, June 12, 11:00-12:15 in Argos E
Johnson, B. K., & Ranzini, G. (2016, June). Click here to look clever: Self-presentation via selective sharing of music and film on social media.

Ouwerkerk, J. W., & Johnson, B. K. (2016, June). Motives for online friending and following: The dark side of social network site connections.

Monday, June 13, 15:30-16:45 in Argos D
Johnson, B. K., & Rosenbaum, J. E. (2016, June). Don’t tell me how it ends: Testing effects of narrative spoilers for film and television.

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May 23 15

Are Spoilers Harmful?

by Benjamin

A few years ago, an exciting study made waves by showing that narrative spoilers could improve enjoyment… a really counterintuitive finding.

My colleague Judith Rosenbaum and I tried to replicate and extend this finding with more nuanced measures of enjoyment and appreciation from the communication literature. This project is now in press at Communication Research. We find that spoilers generally harm enjoyment, in keeping with conventional wisdom.

To make sense of these competing findings, we did another study, where we looked at individual differences. I turns out that people low on need for cognition (those who are not motivated to think hard) prefer to choose spoiled stories… probably because it makes the narrative easier to understand. But, people who had a high need for affect (who want emotion in their life), or who read a lot, experienced less enjoyment of spoiled stories compared to unspoiled stories. This experiment appears in an article over at Psychology of Popular Media Culture.

Next, I am working with students here at the VU University Amsterdam to test these (and other) aspects of spoilers with different television and film materials. People get really excited (i.e., distressed) about spoilers, and program producers and marketers are always walking a fine line in terms of how much to reveal in advance. The effects of spoilers are coming into relief through this research, which can help viewers and readers understand if they really should or should not avoid spoilers, and help program creators understand what to reveal when they are promoting their stories to potential audiences.

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May 21 15

ICA 2015: San Juan

by Benjamin

This weekend, I’ll be sharing some recent research at the ICA annual conference in San Juan, PR.

Friday, May 22 at 9:00am, I’ll present “When Misery Avoids Company” in a session on “Facebook as a Social Comparison Neighborhood.”

Sunday, May 24 at 4:30pm, I’ll present “Science in the Eye of the Beholder” in an environmental communication session.

My colleague Cornelia Mothes will present the results of a study of selective exposure during the 2013 German federal election on Monday at 10:30am.

Finally, I’m chairing my first conference session, on the “Digital Divide” (CAT division), on Monday at 9:00am.

This should all make for another great ICA!

 

References

Johnson, B. K., & Knobloch-Westerwick, S. (2015, May). When misery avoids company: Selective social comparisons to photographic online profiles. Paper to be presented at the 65th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

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Knobloch-Westerwick, S., Johnson, B. K., Silver, N. A., & Westerwick, A. (2015, May). Science in the eye of the beholder: Selective reading and impacts of online science information. Paper to be presented at the 65th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

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Knobloch-Westerwick, S., Mothes, C., Johnson, B. K., Westerwick, A., & Donsbach, W. (2015, May). Political online information searching before the 2013 German federal election: Confirmation bias, source credibility, and attitude impacts. Paper to be presented at the 65th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

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